Elizabeth Price

May 31 – July 29, 2016



Elizabeth Price, We Know (2014); exhibition view Neuer Berliner Kunstverein 2016, photo: Roman MärzElizabeth Price, The Wollworths Choir of 1979 (2013); exhibition view Neuer Berliner Kunstverein 2016, photo: Roman MärzElizabeth Price, The Wollworths Choir of 1979 (2013), video still © Elizabeth Price 2013
Curator: Kathrin Becker

Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, presents the British video artist and Turner Prize winner of 2012, Elizabeth Price, in her first institutional solo exhibition in Berlin. After a career as a pop singer and engaging herself in sculpture, in 2006, Price began to work with video and has since developed an independent and distinctive body of work. In her process-oriented practice she questions the significance of cultural artifacts, collections and archives. She often uses archive images and documents, and discharges them of their original meaning and categorization, so that they develop a life of their own and through the reorganization of the narration in the video obtain spatial and temporal dimensions. The piece
The Woolworths Choir of 1979 (2013) is a 20-minute, rhythmic video collage that combines shots of Gothic choir stalls in medieval cathedrals, an appearance of the girl band The Shangri-Las in the 1960s and a department store fire in a Woolworth branch in Manchester in 1979 and structures them on the sound level with finger snapping and clapping. Price’s main interest here is the question of the autonomy of images and sounds, and the nature of the conventions by which both are interrelated. She creates fragile connections between disparate motifs and in this way consistently makes use of the “elasticity” (Price) of digital video technology. In the title of the piece, she replaces the word “Fire” with “Choir” and, in doing so, reproduces her visual practice at a semantic level.

Elizabeth Price (b. 1966 in Bradford) lives and works in London. In 2012, she received the Turner Prize. Solo exhibitions include: The Model, Sligo (2016); Ashmolean Museum Oxford (2016); Turku Art Museum (2015); Kunsthalle Winterthur (2014); Julia Stoschek Collection, Dusseldorf (2014); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2013); Contemporary Art Society, London (2013); Tate Britain, London (2012, 2010); Bloomberg SPACE, London (2012); The Baltic, Newcastle (2011); New Museum, New York (2011); Spike Island, Bristol (2009).